Notes from an Urban Druid

Gleanings from all my wanderings--Christian, Buddhist, Druid, Wiccan, Pagan thoughts.


Ask me anything  
Reblogged from maythemoonguideyou
maythemoonguideyou:

“Mini Altar” by oy cho on flickr

maythemoonguideyou:

“Mini Altar” by oy cho on flickr

Reblogged from inhabitude
My failure to accomplish or attain any of what I had hoped I would when I set out on the Buddhist path is, I think, the thing that has most enriched my practice. Andrew Cooper, “My Bad” (via wordslessspoken)
Reblogged from noisevogel

noisevogel:

Some Buddhis Alrar’s

Reblogged from seashellsandshamrocks
Reblogged from kelledia
I love the piles of fresh fruit.

I love the piles of fresh fruit.

Reblogged from tenrai-f
tenrai-f:

My Altar.  The Buddha of Compassion is holding court.

Hallo Chenrezig. I have a very similar statue of that size.
OM MANI PADME HUM.

tenrai-f:

My Altar.  The Buddha of Compassion is holding court.

Hallo Chenrezig. I have a very similar statue of that size.

OM MANI PADME HUM.

(via fuckyeahaltars)

Reblogged from atemporal-emptiness

bodhisattva-anahata:

Last night a spark of inspiration hit me for some reason, so I decided to go ahead and make my altar out of the things I have. And it worked out so nicely!!!

Things that interest me that I will post about here

(a somewhat random list)

  • the history of modern Wicca and Witchcraft
  • druids, druidry, druidism of all kinds
  • Buddhism, especially Japanese Zen and Tibetan Vajrayana
  • Anglicanism, especially Anglican writers and poets, English cathedral music
  • Tarot
  • astrology
  • Asatru, heathenry, Northern Tradition
  • the Neopagan Wheel of the Year
  • magic
  • pagan and spiritual books
Reblogged from rorschachx
neiture:

A partially submerged Buddha overgrown by a Bodhi tree in the ruins of Wat Mahathat temple - Ayutthaya, Thailand | image by Adrees Latif

neiture:

A partially submerged Buddha overgrown by a Bodhi tree in the ruins of Wat Mahathat temple - Ayutthaya, Thailand | image by Adrees Latif

(Source: rorschachx, via three-jewels-deactivated2011110)

Reblogged from sharanam
The way to know if what we are doing is worthwhile is to ask,
“Does this lead to the end of suffering or does it not?” If it does, continue. If it does not, we need to switch our attention to what will. We can simply ask ourselves, “Am I experiencing dukkha? Is there a feeling of alienation or difficulty?” If there is, it means that we are clinging or hanging on to something. We need to see that the heart is attached somewhere and then make the gesture to loosen up, to let go. Sometimes we don’t notice where the suffering gets generated. We get so used to doing things in a particular way that we take it as a standard. But in meditation, we challenge the status quo. We investigate where there is a feeling of “dis-ease” and look to see what’s causing it. By stepping back and scanning the inner domain, it’s possible to find out where the attachment is and what’s causing it. Ajahn Chah would say, “If you have an itch on your leg, you don’t scratch your ear.” In other words, go to where the dukkha is, no matter how subtle it may be; notice it and let go. That’s how we allow the dukkha to disperse. This is how we will know whether the practices we are doing are effective or not.
Ajahn Amaro, from Small Boat, Great Mountain (via sharanam)

(via sharanam)

Reblogged from absurdreasoning
May all sentient beings have happiness and its causes,
May all sentient beings be free of suffering and its causes,
May all sentient beings never be separated from bliss without suffering,
May all sentient beings be in equanimity, free of bias, attachment and anger.

Brahma Viharas (The Four Immeasurables)

Traditional Buddhist prayer before beginning meditation

(via anarchyofthemind)

Reblogged from peterreyes

From “Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind” by Shunryu Suzuki

peterreyes:

“Usually to bow means to pay our respects to something which is more worthy of respect than ourselves. But when you bow to Buddha you should have no idea of Buddha, you just become one with Buddha, you are already Buddha himself. When you become one with Buddha, one with everything that exists, you find the true meaning of being. When you forget all your dualistic ideas, everything becomes your teacher, and everything can be the object of worship.”